Last Updated: 06/20/2017

 

  Summer Review (Reading and Math) 2017  
     
  Summer Math  
   
     
  Summer Reading  
 

The goal of HMS Summer Reading is to encourage and promote all students and families to find the time to sit back and enjoy a few hours a week of reading this summer. Similar to our expectations last year, students have the ability to make choices, to read at an ability level that is appropriate for them, and most importantly, to enjoy their reading.

In each grade, teachers have thought critically and carefully about a theme that is meaningful to their grade level. We’d like students to read a book that encompasses that theme so that students entering our doors in the fall have a commonality to discuss with their gradelevel peers..

  • Grade 5, Discovery: Being in a new school, students will make discoveries by meeting new teachers and new friends. They will even discover their lockers! Even more importantly, students will make discoveries about themselves: who they are as a student, friend, and learner.

  • Grade 6, Integrity: As students settle into their middle school career, we remind them about the importance of character development and having integrity.

  • Grade 7, Change: Moving up to the second floor of HMS is more than just a change in location, it’s about growing up and experiencing significant changes in life.

  • Grade 8, Grit: Grit is the sum of determination, courage, and refusal to allow obstacles to stand in the way of goals. Students entering their final year in middle school, learn that while things are not always easy, success and goals can be reached with grit.

It is expected that students will read a book connected to one of these themes; discovery, integrity, change, or grit. A list of books will be included for each grade level. We expect all students to read a book that is considered “just right” for them. Help your student select a book from the list that isn’t too easy, or too hard.

After reading their book, students should take time to reflect on their reading and complete a grade-specific assignment or project. Friday, September 15 will be a dedicated Summer Reading Day at HMS during which students will have the opportunity to present and reflect on their reading experiences. As it is expected that all students participate in Summer Reading, the reflections and projects will be factored into students’ Term 1 grades in English. Please see the grade-level specifics included below, as well as details regarding the Summer Reading Reflection. Projects are listed at the end.

We look forward to continuing the Summer Reading project and encouraging reading over the summer months! Please don’t hesitate to contact the school if you need help, or if you have any questions or concerns. Additionally, we will inform the John Curtis Library of the summer reading books.
 
     
  Grade 5 Summer Reading  
 

“The only real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes in seeing the universe with the eyes of another, of hundreds of others, in seeing the hundreds of universes that each of them sees.” - Marcel Proust

“The man who reads lives a thousand lives, the man who does not lives one.” -George R.R. Martin

To discover (verb): 1. to see, get knowledge of, learn of, find, or find out; gain sight or knowledge. 2. to notice or realize.
A discovery could be about an idea or concept, or a self-discovery about your own self. The theme of discovery was chosen for you as incoming middle-schoolers because it fits in very well with your upcoming 5th grade year.

Throughout the 5 th grade experience and curriculum, the theme of discovery is common. Whether it is studying about explorers in Social Studies, observing experiments in Science, learning a new Math concept, or using critical thinking in English, you will experience many instances of discovery. Being in a new school, you will make new discoveries by meeting new teachers and new friends; you will even discover your locker! Even more so, you will make discoveries about yourself: who you are as a student, friend, and learner. You are about to embark on a new journey soon – entering Middle School!

Through our summer reading program, you have the opportunity to prepare yourselves for this transition from elementary school to middle school by reading about discoveries and adventures in literature. In the books we have selected for you, you may be able to relate to some characters that will be going through the same thing you are going through. Whether it is through many different characters’ points of view in a realistic fiction genre, or adventures through classical literature or sports fiction, you will find the theme of discovery. Whatever the characters or the adventures, they all will discover something new about themselves and the world around them.

This summer, instead of choosing a book for you to read, we are giving you a theme or topic and a list of books to choose from. These stories feature someone who faces the challenge of a new discovery or of someone who discovers a new beginning through hardships, choices, circumstances, etc. Look through the list below and read a suggested book, and maybe challenge yourself to read them all!

  • Because of Mr. Terupt, by Rob Buyea
  • The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tullane, by Kate DiCamillo
  • Out of My Mind, by Sharon Draper
  • Heat,  by Mike Lupica
  • My Father’s Dragon, by Ruth Stiles Gannett
  • The Odyssey (Classic Starts Series)- Abridged, by Homer (edited by Tania Zamorsky)
  • Finding Serendipity, by Angelica Banks

It is expected that all of our students will read one of these books that makes them think about discovery and what a new journey is about. We want everyone to read a book that is considered “just right” for them (not too easy, not too hard). You should be able to comprehend and fluently read the book that you have chosen. In addition, please choose one of the assignments to complete over the summer after you have finished your book. You may choose to write a response, or select one of the projects. Once assignments are reviewed, all writing and projects will be factored into your Term 1 grade in English.

Option 1:
Write a 1-page response to the following writing prompt. This prompt is appropriate for all of the books on the list.

Grade 5 Writing Prompt: Think about the journey the main character from your book went on. How did the character change from the beginning of the journey to the end? Write about these changes and describe the journey.

Option 2:
Choose a summer-reading project from the attached list of ideas.

Bring your written responses OR your projects with you on September 12, 2016. This day will be our summer-reading day, a day to reflect on what we read and learned about over the summer. We will be eagerly waiting to learn about your summer reading experiences.

With best wishes for a happy, restful, and safe summer, The Hanover Middle School Fifth Grade English Teachers: Mrs. Stacey DeCotis, Mrs. Dawn Brandmark, Mr. Tom Ryan

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  Grade 6 Summer Reading  
 

“Character is doing the right thing when nobody’s looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that’s right is to get by, and the only thing that’s wrong is to get caught”
- JC Watts, American Politician

“Though much is taken, much abides; and though
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield”
- Alfred, Lord Tennyson

True heroism and integrity come from the actions we take when nobody is looking. We are not heroes for an audience, nor do we have integrity for applause. To paraphrase a quote that many of you have heard from Mr. Hogan, "Integrity (being a champion) is doing the right thing when no one is watching". In Middle School, we face choices every day, every period, every minute sometimes. Do we choose the path that we know, inside, to be right even if that path is harder, or more risky for our social acceptance? Or do we take the easy path, and quietly accept the approval of our peers with cowardice?

Or, do we instead take a third path? Do we change the majority into one that will stand beside us in integrity, so that doing the right thing is not an unusual circumstance, but one that we do daily? It is through our summer reading this year that we are going to explore that possibility. Rather than choosing a required reading, we have chosen to provide you with this theme. Find a story that tells of someone who is a true hero - not because of their job, not because of their responsibilities, but because of what they do when nobody is watching.

It is expected that all of our students will take advantage of this opportunity and read something that makes them think about who they wish to be as people. A list of suitable texts are listed below, but you may feel free to add to this list if you wish. In addition, please choose one of the assignments to complete over the summer after you have finished your book.

  • Number the Stars, by Lois Lowry
  • My Brother Sam is Dead, by Christopher Collier and James Lincoln Collier
  • The Last Shot, by John Feinstein
  • Counting by Sevens, by Holly Goldberg Sloan
  • The Boy on the Wooden Box, by Leon Leyson
  • Treasure Island, by Daniel Defoe
  • The Secret Garden, by Francis Hodgson Burnett
  • Wizard of Earthsea, by Ursula K. LeGuin

Please bring your projects with you on September 12, 2016. This day will be our summer-reading day, a day to reflect on what we read and learned about over the summer. We will be eagerly waiting to learn about your summer reading experiences. It is expected that all students participate in summer reading and complete one of the assignments listed above; therefore, once assignments are reviewed, all writing and projects will be factored into your Term 1 grade in English.

With best wishes for a happy, restful, and safe summer, The Hanover Middle School Sixth Grade English Department: Mr. Steven Henderson, Mrs. Jennifer Foss, Ms. Rachael Brewin

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  Grade 7 Summer Reading  
 

“This is a new year.  A new beginning. And things will change.”
- Taylor Swift

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world.”
- Mahatma Gandhi

“If you don’t like something, change it.  If you can’t change it, change your attitude.”  
- Maya Angelou

Change is something people encounter in every stage of their lives. Change can be good or bad; change can be easy or challenging. Seventh grade is a year when students encounter many changes and transitions- academically, socially, and physically. We anticipate positive changes for all of the seventh grade students. To explore this theme and begin to think about change, all students are expected to participate in summer reading by reading one (or more!) of the books from the list below.

Please read ONE of the following novels dealing with the theme of CHANGE:

  • Jeremy Fink and the Meaning of Life, by Wendy Mass
  • Zen and the Art of Faking It, by Jordan Sonnenblick
  • Listening for Lions, by Gloria Whelan
  • The Wednesday Wars, by Gary D. Schmidt
  • The Ballad of Lucy Whipple, by Karen Cushman
  • The Wright Brothers: How They Invented the Airplane, by Russell Freedman

Please choose ONE of the following reading Activities:

A. Write a 2-page reflection on your reading experience. Your reflection should include your thoughts and insights on the text, as well as how the novel demonstrates the theme of change.

OR

B. Choose a summer-reading project from the attached list of ideas. Bring your written reflections OR your projects with you on Friday, September 15. This day will be our summer-reading day, a day to reflect on what we read and learned about over the summer. We will be eagerly waiting to learn about your summer reading experiences! Once assignments are reviewed, all reflections and projects will be factored into your Term 1 grade in English.

With best wishes for a happy, restful, and safe summer, The Hanover Middle School Seventh Grade English Department: Mrs. Caitlin Carceo, Mrs. Andrea McNamara

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  Grade 8 Summer Reading  
 

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.”
-Ralph Waldo Emerson\

In AMLE Magazine , Rick Wormeli said that: “[i]n some domains today’s students are incredibly tenacious”, a sentiment with which both Mrs. Stamper and Mrs. Cotter agree. We have chosen fiction and nonfiction books that illustrate different examples of people using tenacity, determination, and grit to achieve goals or to simply survive. We feel that it is important for students to learn that while life is not always easy, success and goals can be reached with grit and determination.

Please choose one of the books from the grade 8 “Grit” summer reading list below:

  • The Fault in Our Stars by John Green
  • Paper Towns by John Green
  • Geeks by Jon Katz
  • Gathering Blue by Lois Lowry
  • Cinder by Marissa Meyer
  • Elephant Run by Roland Smith
  • The Uglies by Scott Westerfeld

In order to prepare for English in the fall, we would like you, the rising eighth graders, to choose one of the books from the “Grade Eight Grit” summer reading list to read over the summer. We also ask that you choose and complete a project from the attached list of ideas in order to better connect with the novel you read. There is a Grade 8 Only Option at the end of the list. The projects are due on Friday, September 15, and will be factored into the Term 1 grades. We hope that each of you enjoys both your book choice and your project; we cannot wait to see your projects in the fall!

With best wishes for a happy, restful, and safe summer, The Hanover Middle School Eighth Grade English Department: Mrs. Melissa Cotter, Mrs. Martha Stamper

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  Summer Reading Projects  
 

Newspaper, CD, Piece of Artistic Expression, Comic Book, Chracter Journal, Getting into Character, Poetry Journal, Movie Trailer, Compare and Contrast Book to Movie, Create a Game, 8th Grade Only Option

Newspaper: Create and write a newspaper, including multiple pages, detailing the various subjects explored in your book. You must include five to ten articles having to do with your story. Remember there is no “white space” in a newspaper. The layout of your newspaper should cover every available space. Cartoons, classifieds, advertisements, pictures, and editorials are examples of what you can add to your newspaper to make it more interesting and creative. Remember that every part of the newspaper needs to relate to the events in your book.

CD: Imagine that you have been hired to develop a soundtrack to your book. Find at least ten songs that showcase the book’s themes, settings, emotions, characters, etc. You must include the following with your project: a CD with the songs (if possible), a CD jacket including lyrics and illustrations, and, for each song an explanation of your song choice and how the song relates to your book. You must also include specific song lyrics in your explanation.

Piece of Artistic Expression: If you are artistic or good with your hands, create a painting, sculpture, diorama, or other visual media object connected to your book. You’ll need to write a 1-2 page explanation of the object and how it connects to the book you just read.

Comic Book: Create a comic book using the plot of the book you just read. You don’t need to include every little detail, but all the main events and main characters should be covered. The project should include at least fifteen different frames. Your comic book should be illustrated in color.

Character Journal: Choose one character from your book and write five to ten journal entries from his or her point of view. Detail the thoughts and feelings of this character as he or she experiences the plot of your novel. Each entry should be one page in length, typed, double spaced.

Getting Into Character: If you consider yourself an actor or actress, you might like to take on the persona of a character from your book. Prepare a presentation in which YOU are that character and tell the story of your book from the character’s point of view. Your presentation should be well prepared and you should plan to dress up or include props to enhance your performance.

Poetry Journal: If you enjoy writing poetry, you can write a collection of poems that chronicle your novel. You need to write five to ten poems that correspond to characters, themes, events, or other elements seen throughout your novel. Along with each poem, your collection should include some kind of illustration or image to go along with each poem.

Movie Trailer: If you think the book you just read would make a great movie, create a movie trailer to show to the class. It should be 2-5 minutes in length and you should be able to show the final product to the class. If you choose this project, please be sure that your technology matches the technology we have here at HMS. Check before the day you present that your trailer is all set to be viewed.

Compare and Contrast Book to Movie (if movie is available): Write about one and onehalf pages that explains and discusses both what is similar in the book and movie along with what is different. Also explain if any of the differences made the story line different. Was the ending the same or different? Include your opinion.

Create a Game: You are a board game manufacturer, and you have been assigned the task of creating a board game based on your book that will help students review everything they read in a fun and interesting way!

Requirements: Using a file folder, colored paper, colored pencils, and markers, create a game board. Put the name of your game on the tab of the folder and decorate the inside so that it is a game board. Make it neat, colorful, interesting, and creative!

  1. Make your game board neat, colorful, interesting, and creative!
  2. Create at least 25 questions and answers for your game that relate to the
    novel. The questions must be somehow incorporated into playing the
    game.
  3. Relate the format and purpose of your game to the novel in some way.
    Example: the game board is in the shape of a castle or the purpose is to
    escape the evil grandmother.
  4. Write directions for your game that would make it perfectly clear how to
    play the game. Type the directions and glue them to the back cover of the
    file folder.
  5. Make sure the content and difficulty of your game are appropriate for your
    novel and for your classmates’ abilities.
    ( from readwritethink.org )

8th Grade Only Option: Whose Phone is This?
Please read the direction and see the example below.

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